Get ready to watch the rare moment: Total Lunar Eclipse with a Supermoon (because it isn’t happening for another 10 YEARS)

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Spectators around the world can expect to see a trio of celestial events intertwine to create a spectacular total lunar eclipse in the coming days.

The first full moon of the year is known as the Wolf Moon.

When the Earth's shadow completely blankets the moon, this causes its surface to turn red as it enters the planet's shade, known as a Blood Moon.

 If the skies are clear, the eclipse will be visible in North and South America, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts. Pictured,  photo shows the lunar eclipse from a blood moon (top L) back to full moon (bottom right) in the sky over Frankfurt, Germany, July 27, 2018.




If the skies are clear, the eclipse will be visible in North and South America, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts. Pictured, photo shows the lunar eclipse from a blood moon (top L) back to full moon (bottom right) in the sky over Frankfurt, Germany, July 27, 2018.

The moon will also be slightly closer to the Earth, causing it to appear brighter than usual, dubbed a Super Moon.

These unique factors, when combined, result in a 'Super Blood Wolf Moon'.

The eclipse should be visible in North and South America, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts.

The rest of Europe, as well as Africa, will be able to see a partial view of the eclipse, while Asia, Australia and New Zealand will miss the spectacle.

This will be the last time that sky watchers in the UK will be able to experience a total lunar eclipse until 2029.

Spectators can expect the Moon to begin to darken slowly before turning red as it becomes completely caught in Earth’s shade.

Dr. Mark Birkinshaw, a professor of Cosmology and Astrophysics at the University of Bristol, told MailOnline that the phenomenon is the same reason the sun appears a dark shade of red when it sits low in the sky.




 Spectators around the world can expect to see a 'Super Blood Wolf Moon' lunar eclipse which will happen next week. The eclipse should be visible in North and South America, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts (file photo)  The first full moon of the year is known as the Wolf Moon. When the Earth's shadow completely blankets the moon, this causes its surface to turn red as it enters the planet's shade, known as a Blood Moon (pictured in this 2018 file photo)

Spectators around the world can expect to see a 'Super Blood Wolf Moon' lunar eclipse which will happen next week. The eclipse should be visible in North and South America, Greenland, Iceland, Ireland, Great Britain, Norway, Sweden, Portugal and the French and Spanish coasts (file photo)

The first full moon of the year is known as the Wolf Moon. When the Earth's shadow completely blankets the moon, this causes its surface to turn red as it enters the planet's shade, known as a Blood Moon. This graphic shows what people around the world can expect to see

The first full moon of the year is known as the Wolf Moon. When the Earth's shadow completely blankets the moon, this causes its surface to turn red as it enters the planet's shade, known as a Blood Moon. This graphic shows what people around the world can expect to see

'The light that passes through the Earth's atmosphere hits the Moon and then gets reflected back to us, and it will be red,' he said The entire eclipse lasts for more than five hours, ending at 7:48 am.

The peak of the eclipse will occur at approximately 5:12am GMT for viewers in the UK.

The total eclipse is set to last just over an hour, with the partial eclipse visible for almost four hours.

Mathematically, the longest a lunar eclipse could ever last one hour and 47 minutes.

This is the period of totality, where the moon lies entirely in the Earth’s full shadow, known as its umbra, causing it to appear red.

North America is in the best position to view a total lunar eclipse for years.

It will pass over the continent late on Sunday night, just before the stroke of midnight.

 The entire eclipse lasts for more than five hours, ending at 7:48 am GMT for viewers in the UK. The peak of the eclipse will occur at approximately 5:12am GMT and it will be widely viewable across the western hemisphere (pictured)

The entire eclipse lasts for more than five hours, ending at 7:48 am GMT for viewers in the UK. The peak of the eclipse will occur at approximately 5:12am GMT and it will be widely viewable across the western hemisphere (pictured)

 From start to finish, the umbral lunar eclipse will last just over three and-a-half hours, with totality accounting for roughly an hour of this time, according to EarthSky. This is when the moon sits in the shadow of our planet, taking on a reddish hue as a result of light scattering

From start to finish, the umbral lunar eclipse will last just over three and-a-half hours, with totality accounting for roughly an hour of this time, according to EarthSky. This is when the moon sits in the shadow of our planet, taking on a reddish hue as a result of light scattering

 Sometimes the eclipsed Moon is a deep red colour, almost disappearing from view, and sometimes it can be quite bright. This February 1, 2018, image shows a blood moon rising behind St Paul's Cathedral (file photo)

Sometimes the eclipsed Moon is a deep red color, almost disappearing from view, and sometimes it can be quite bright. This February 1, 2018, image shows a blood moon rising behind St Paul's Cathedral (file photo)

In January, the full moon is also sometimes known as the wolf moon or Great Spirit moon.

In the UK, the Moon will be above the horizon throughout the eclipse, although from southeast the sun will have risen as it comes to an end.

No equipment is needed to view the event, with the naked eye more than enough to watch the impressive celestial event.

Unlike a solar eclipse, where the moon crosses the path of the sun, it is perfectly safe to look directly at the lunar eclipse.

 North America is in the best position to view a total lunar eclipse for years. It will pass over the continent late on Sunday night, just before the stroke of midnight. The Super Blood Moon rises over buildings  in Beijing last year (file photo)

North America is in the best position to view a total lunar eclipse for years. It will pass over the continent late on Sunday night, just before the stroke of midnight. The Super Blood Moon rises over buildings in Beijing last year (file photo)

Americans will be able to watch the start of the eclipse on Sunday evening.

In the Eastern US, the Moon will be even higher, from south Florida it will be almost directly overhead at mid-totality and from New York at mid-eclipse the Moon will be 70-degrees high.

The UK falls slightly outside of the ideal viewing range, meaning people will have to stay up late or wake up very early to see it.

Some parts of the very edge of western Africa will be able to catch a glimpse of the event, while the rest of Europa and Asia will only get to see a partial eclipse towards the end.

During the eclipse, the Moon will still be visible, but in a shade of red which is why a lunar eclipse is often called a 'Blood Moon.'

The red color is due to the same phenomenon that causes sunsets to appear pink, orange or red.

'A little bit of sunlight is refracted by the Earth's atmosphere and reaches the Moon, bending around the edges of the Earth,' Walter Freeman, an assistant teaching professor at Syracuse University's physics department, told AFP on January 14.

'This small amount of red light still illuminates the Moon enough for us to see it. Instead of being bright and white, the Moon will be very dim and red, 10,000 or so times dimmer than usual.'

Lunar eclipses always happen at a full Moon as this is when it moves behind the Earth and into line with the Earth and Sun.

 During the eclipse, the Moon will still be visible, but in a shade of red which is why a lunar eclipse is often called a 'Blood Moon'.  Pictured: The Super Blue Blood Moon sets over downtown Los Angeles last year (file photo)

During the eclipse, the Moon will still be visible, but in a shade of red which is why a lunar eclipse is often called a 'Blood Moon'.  Pictured: The Super Blue Blood Moon sets over downtown Los Angeles last year (file photo)

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